3 Simple Passing Concepts for Any Offense

By the end of this blog you will know the 3 passing concepts that will take your offense to the next level. 

It does not matter what offense you run, these 3 passing concepts will give your players the structure that they need and the confidence to execute.

What do I mean?

By using these specific passing concepts, your offense will attack the whole field and your players will know how that is happening.

Okay, ready?

Let’s go.

1. 4 Verticals

Call this play whatever you want.

Some call it “Daytona,” some call it “Verts,” and in the Air Raid they call it “6” because this play goes for 6 all the time.

This play is usually run by giving everyone a Go route. I like to tweak it just a bit.

Take a look:

Now let me explain.

L: Run a 15 yard comeback. This is to help the quarterback for when he says “Oh, Sh*t!” That’s why I have that labeled as “OS” in the progression. L must sprint as fast as possible to really sell the vertical threat.

F: Run a seam with a yard outside the hash as your aiming point. (WO means “Wide Open.” That’s the only way the quarterback will throw this)

T: Run a flare route away from the comeback. Here, that would be to the right.

Y: Run a seam with a yard outside the hash as your aiming point.

R: Run an outside release go route with the top of the numbers as your aiming point.

Q: 3 step drop. Read to the running back side outside in.

And that’s it. Go score 6 points with this great play.

2. Y-Corner

You need this play because it’s an easy all defense beater.

Zone? No problem.

Man? No problem.

Coach Nick Saban’s Cover 7 nonsense? No problem.

Take a look:

L: Hitch. If the ball is not thrown immediately, work inside.

F: Run a skinny slant. Ball will be thrown against any blitz from that side.

T: Run the flare.

Y. Run a 6 step corner. If you are in the red zone, aim it at the BACK pylon. If you are out of the red zone, aim it at the FRONT pylon. Why? So that your quarterback and wide receivers all know where the ball should be thrown and you are using the field to your advantage.

R: Run a snag with a little foot fire to buy some time. Aim at the apex defender over the Y.

Q. 3 step drop. The read here actually starts backside. If you love the hitch by L, take it. If you might get pressure from a backside backer, rip the skinny slant. If none of that happens, work the numbered progression on your drop.

Personally, this play is a go to in the red zone, but you can use it whenever you need a comfortable play for your quarterback.

3. Stick

If you’ve followed me for any amount of time, then you probably already knew this.

It’s easy to install and easy to read.

In other words, it’s beautiful.

Judge for yourself:

L: Hitch. If the ball is not thrown immediately, work inside.

F: Run a skinny slant. Ball will be thrown against any blitz from that side.

T: Run the flare.

Y: Run a 5 yard hitch.

R: Run a mandatory outside release go route. You have to stress this point because your player might think it’s okay to run inside every once in awhile. It’s not. Get outside and stay outside.

Q: Catch and rip it. In the diagram above, you will notice that I do not include any numbers for the progression. There is none. All your quarterback needs to do is figure out if the apex defender is trying to get to your running back. If your quarterback doesn’t think that linebacker can make a play on the running back, then he needs to let it fly to the running back. Otherwise, just take the hitch.

If you fell in love with this play and want to know more, check out this video I made awhile back.

BONUS Concept: The New Age Sweep

Why don’t more teams do this?

You get one of (hopefully) your best athletes the ball with 3 on 3 blocking.

You’re welcome.

Until next time, please continue to Master the Spread, Score Points, and Have Fun!

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